6 comments on “A Rant On Running

    • Andrew—

      Thanks for your comments. Please allow me to offer a few thoughts which hopefully will provide for you some clarity.

      You said:

      So where is the pronounced falling and reseting of the torso in running, akin to falling into a wall before reseting? Either you’re falling or you’re not. There’s no secret invisible falling.

      No secret. It’s the GCM— general center of mass— that is falling and that is reset, or lifted, very shortly after mid-stance, or the Running Pose.

      And, you said:

      I’m amazed that the simplest explanation has been ignored in favour of an impossible perpetual motion explanation. When leaning forward, you’re better equipped to push backwards via lengthening of the leg. This prevents you from actually falling the same as the continuous forward push prevents a rod from falling. Problem solved.

      Ostensibly. You see, after a certain point in the Fall vertical ground reaction drops below bodyweight. There’s nothing left to push against! As well, posterior ground reaction is always below bodyweight, anyway. Just overlay any runner’s stride on a force plate graph and you’ll see this reality quite easily. Sure, there is push, but it occurs immediately after mid-stance, is brief, and is effectively upward— anything past vertical and to about 22.5°. Picture the big hand on an analog clock reading 12:04. Up!

      Then, you said:

      If we’re seriously supposed to believe gravity is providing the movement, its a huge mistake to compare to a “falling rod” that is probably driven not by gravity but by being pushed forwards.

      The falling rod demonstrates that when balance is disturbed the GCM rotates about it’s support, or contact point with the ground, as it falls. Obviously, the GCM is moving from point A to point B throughout its fall. At some point in the fall the rod loses traction and its support slides out from under it, while the runner— within his usable range of fall (and before losing traction)— simply changes support and falls again, again, and again. Stride by stride, his GCM moves from point A to point B to point C, and so on, on down the road.

      Notice that every foot race begins with runners lifting one foot— which begins changing the position of that leg’s center of mass, which of course affects the entire body— and releasing the calf muscles that had been maintaining balance. This loss of balance begets movement. Watch runners at the start line of a 5K in slow motion. Or, simply stand with your feet about shoulder width apart. Lift one foot. What happens?

      Finally, you said:

      Ironically, the explanation for running is indeed incredibly similar (in that gravity doesn’t remotely account for either, which are both explained by the propulsion which PREVENTS the risk of falling). Remove the fantastical nonsense that you supposedly get energy for free and it’s a perfectly credible model.

      While I’m pretty good at deciphering meaning from rather complex— and even ridiculously convoluted— arguments, I have no idea what you’re trying to say, here.

      In any event, before dismissing Pose Method running out of common misunderstanding, why not investigate running further by reading through my other articles on sportfit.com— scroll down for a links list— with the mind of a curious explorer, or an objective scientist? Hell, you might even want to find a coach and learn Pose Method yourself! After all, what could be better for gaining new insights and understandings than first hand experience?

      —Christopher

  1. If we’re seriously supposed to believe gravity is providing the movement, its a huge mistake to compare to a “falling rod” that is probably driven not by gravity but by being pushed forwards. Ironically, the explanation for running is indeed incredibly similar (in that gravity doesn’t remotely account for either, which are both explained by the propulsion which PREVENTS the risk of falling). Remove the fantastical nonsense that you supposedly get energy for free and it’s a perfectly credible model.

  2. So where is the pronounced falling and reseting of the torso in running, akin to falling into a wall before reseting? Either you’re falling or you’re not. There’s no secret invisible falling.

    I’m amazed that the simplest explanation has been ignored in favour of an impossible perpetual motion explanation. When leaning forward, you’re better equipped to push backwards via lengthening of the leg. This prevents you from actually falling the same as the continuous forward push prevents a rod from falling. Problem solved.

  3. Howdy
    As a running shoe store owner I get to hear everyone’s opinions. The fact is no one is going to win the “right way to run” war. 90% of what I hear on how to run is the same. One thing I hear all the time is watch a kid run and do that. You know what I don’t see? Kids arguing about who is running better or incorrectly.
    You know what is really sad? The fact that I barely remember anything from our last weeks clinic except for that there was a disagreement about how gravity is used by a human during running motion. okay, I also remember the clinic went 30 minutes longer that I was expecting. Never mind that!

    The last thing the running industry needs is a running form “belief” war. I know running form better than you! My system is better! You suck and don’t know what your talking about! I’m better than you and look better! I have a big fancy degree, I invented the word degree…….I think you get my point.

    Ever heard of “Your actions are so loud I can’t hear what your saying”?

    I got an idea let’s all share our ideas and appreciate that we all want everyone to run better and live even betterer! (Yes, I just made that word up) I think we should embrace other peoples ideas and enjoy sharing them. I am so into agreeing to disagree. I love when I disagree with someone because it gives me a reason to call then stupid…..just before I give them a big buddy hug.

    Last note: Running is so natural, arguing about it is so not.

    Thanks for your time.

    Jeff R
    Runnergy

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